Get PPC & CRO Knowledge Right To Your Inbox
Covering topics to help your business make more money.

163 Facebook Ad Examples
You Can’t Help But Copy

by Evan Oliver under PPC

Get Your Free Proposal


251 Businesses Got a Proposal From us Last Month (Dec, 2018). You should Get One Too.

Continue
Competitor Info
Optimization Tips
Custom Pricing
Last Step
Previous step

Don't worry! We need your website and contact info because we want to send you our research for your free proposal.

Send my free proposal
Previous step

Processing...

Thanks!

Please look out for an email from us.

Whoops!
problem here.

try again

Editor’s Note: This post has been updated with new links and examples for you to steal learn from. 😉

This blog post holds the most Facebook ad examples of any kind.

But wanna know the best part?

We actually share the data behind WHY the Facebook ads are performing the way they are.

Plus, we take it a step further and share the Facebook Ads Library that allows you to view any ad from the last 90 days from any company.

Not to mention that you’ll have more Facebook ad variety through image, carousel, and video ads.

Annndd…

We’ll finish the entire blog post with deeper critiques of different types of Facebook ads.

Our Best Facebook Ad Examples

To start off, we want to showcase some results that we’ve gotten for our own clients. Learn more about how you can create great Facebook ads by getting inspiration from a few of our ad examples that have seen success.

1. Best Self Co

Best Self

Best Self

Sometimes the time of year really matters when it comes to your promotions, and the ad surrounding this intimacy deck shows that.

During the month of January, directly ahead of Valentine’s Day in mid-February, this ad saw an 11% increase in return on ad spend (ROAS)

What’s different? Our messaging about using it for “date night” was much more effective than other ads that were only highlighting the “reignite spark” messaging. A lot of longtime couples forget to take time for themselves, so this calls out an easy, fun way to get that done.

2. Still Novel

Still Novel

Still Novel

This Still Novel ad saw a 47% drop in cost per action (CPA) and a 52% increase in ROAS.

This ad’s testimonial combined with the copy talking about how fast and easy the service is gets people excited to buy.

3. Bloomberg

Bloomberg

Bloomberg

Scary map, I know. But why did this work so well? Well, it’s foolish to assume that recent events don’t affect recent campaigns. And the truth is that COVID-19 is playing a big role in advertising during these stressful times.

The results: an 8% decrease in CPA – and that’s coming from an already very healthy campaign!

4. Fashionphile

Fashionphile

Fashionphile

The results? 27% decrease in CPA and 76% increase in ROAS.

This ad hits all the value props that their ideal customer is looking for: 100% guarantee of authenticity, heavily discounted retail price, and a lovely display of the product to show both quality, color, and size.

5. Mathnasium

Mathnasium

Mathnasium

Here are a few reasons to learn from this bad boy: 37% decrease in CPA!

What do we like about this ad? It hits all potential entrepreneur questions: business with a mission, huge revenue potential, fastest growing and successful franchise in

the US, and also getting exclusive rights for your country.

6. Swolverine

Swolverine

Swolverine

136% increase in ROAS. I don’t even need to emphasize how impressive that is, do I?

What’s one of the biggest negatives with protein powders? It tastes bad. And this ad goes against that and talks about how great the new flavor tastes – calling out and immediately solving one of the product’s primary pain points.

And it’s all brought together with that fantastic headline: “Taste The Gains.”

7. Yoga International

Yoga International

Yoga International

This Yoga International ad saw a 29% decrease in CPA.

What works? Polling ads! This is a fairly new ad type, but it feels organic and gives the user the opportunity to engage with the ad in a fun way. This ad also gets a huge value proposition of a long free trial along with the sense of urgency from the “limited-time offer.”

Best Video Facebook Ad Examples

Videos on Facebook generate up to 8 billion views each day, including video ads. This is why Facebook video ads can be so powerful for grabbing your audience’s attention and getting them to take the action you’re looking for.

These video ads range from basic slideshows to full productions, and you can choose the style that works for your brand. And if you’re looking to hire actors, check out Backstage. (Full disclosure – we work with them.)

Check out these video Facebook ad examples to learn more about how you can be using video in your digital advertising strategy.

8. Supergoop

Supergoop

Supergoop

Supergoop’s video ad showcasing their various sunscreen products is a great example of a slideshow ad.

This video type doesn’t take a huge production team on your end – simply gather some photos or cut-outs like we see in this ad example, and sew them together using a video app.

9. Chipotle

Chipotle

Chipotle

Who doesn’t love a good food video? Chipotle is absolutely playing to their audience with this video ad.

And the added call-to-action to order pick-up or delivery now is definitely enticing to any hungry person stumbling across this video ad.

10 & 11. Hulu

Hulu

Hulu

Hulu

Hulu

Hulu’s video ads are a bit unique as they constantly have tons of video footage and assets to use for ad creation.

For example, both of these ads focus on shows their subscribers can watch on their platform, providing an incentive for people who may not have signed up for Hulu yet to click that Sign Up button.

12. Dropps

Dropps

Dropps

Give your brand a bit of humor. This video ad by Dropps showcases their CEO in the bathtub telling you a story about laundry.

Not every video ad is going to be cut and dry. Some need to have a naked executive taking a bath to catch your audience’s eye.

13 & 14. GrubHub

GrubHub

GrubHub

GrubHub

GrubHub

GrubHub’s video ads are quick and to the point. Delicious food, with a call-to-action for their perks program. Who could resist?

15. Netflix

Netflix

Netflix

This Netflix ad example is a classic example of not knowing where to look first, but it works for them and what they’re selling. This ad showcases several of the platforms most popular shows at the moment, grabbing attention and attracting sign-ups.

16. Spotify

Spotify

Spotify

Your video doesn’t have to be long to do the job. This Spotify ad is 3 seconds long and showcases a repetitive animation of someone in the kitchen flipping vegetables in a pan with quick and concise copy selling their product.

17. Duolingo

Duolingo

Duolingo

Duolingo is famous for the humor they bring into their brand messaging, and it shows in this adorably animated video.

Humor and personality can work for a brand, as long as you’re brave enough to give it a try.

18. Nixit

Nixit

Nixit

Nixit’s video ad example is a great peek into how stop motion videos can look in Facebook ads, and they’ve absolutely nailed this one.

A basic stop motion video that lasts only a few seconds won’t take days to complete, and they’ve perfectly ended the video with their bright colors, bold fonts, and compelling copy.

19. Headspace

Headspace

Headspace

Headspace’s video ad is a fantastic example of how they’re using their product to create compelling ads that really grab attention and sell their product.

By using shapes and simple copy to simulate a breathing exercise, they’re immediately roping their target audience in and getting them interested in downloading their app.

Best Carousel Facebook Ad Examples

Now it’s time to move onto our next category of ad examples – carousel ads. These types of ads are basically a carousel or slideshow of images or videos that users can click through and browse everything the ad has to offer.

Let’s dive into a few top examples of these so that you can really grasp the potential that carousel ads could have for your business.

20, 21, & 22. Patagonia

Patagonia

Patagonia

Patagonia

Patagonia

Patagonia

Patagonia

These Patagonia ads are simple, but perfect. Their carousel ad switches between a lifestyle photo of their product in use and the actual product photo as it’s seen in their online store.

Giving users the ability to see both of these options upfront can show them just how much potential they could have by purchasing a Patagonia product.

23. Sperry

Patagonia

Sperry

This Sperry carousel ad is equal parts creative and visually appealing. By stitching photos together like this, they’ve created an elongated image that users can’t help but want to scroll through.

24. Everlane

Everlane

Everlane

Everlane takes their carousel ad here and uses a simple but effective strategy – showcasing a different product in each one of their sections.

This is a great way to get the most out of an ad, rather than creating separate ads for each product you want to promote, especially if they’re similar.

25. The Sill

The Sill

The Sill

This carousel ad by The Sill includes a happy medium of photos and graphics combined together to tell a story.

They take viewers through different parts of a home in each slide, showcasing how amazing life could be with greenery.

26. Madewell

Madewell

Madewell

This Madewell ad is unique because they’ve combined both video and carousel ads into one, placing a video on each slide. This can be effective because it helps them to get even more potential out of a single ad set.

27. Magic Spoon Cereal

Magic Spoon Cereal

Magic Spoon Cereal

These Magic Spoon Cereal carousel ads are stunningly eye-catching, with monochromatic slides showcasing bowls and boxes of cereal alongside a similarly-colored spoon.

28. Mejuri

Mejuri

Mejuri

This stunning carousel ad gives users a sneak peek into what their jewelry boxes can look like, if only they click on that Shop Now button and get to purchasing.

Best Product Facebook Ad Examples

Sometimes you don’t need a fancy video or carousel ad to flaunt what you’ve got. Here’s a list of awesome Facebook ad examples that are doing nothing but highlighting awesome products.

29, 30, & 31. Glossier

Glossier

Glossier

Glossier

Glossier

Glossier

Glossier

These three ad examples by Glossier are so incredibly simple and so effective at the same time. Basic flatlay photos alongside some compelling copy can work wonderfully for getting paying customers into the “door” of your ecommerce store.

32. Beyond Yoga

Beyond Yoga

Beyond Yoga

This slideshow ad uses a few photos of this awesome, best-selling product to reel in potential buyers and get them to click to their website and add to cart.

33 & 34. Lunya

Lunya

Lunya

Lunya

Lunya

Okay, I know I said you don’t need video, but sometimes a short, 10-second video of someone in your product is all you need to really make the sale.

I mean, look at how comfortable these women look. And with a basic text overlay selling the product even more, I can hear buyers clicking that Shop Now button.

35. West Elm

West Elm

West Elm

You don’t always need a carousel ad to showcase a variety of products. A short video like this one with seamless transitions is another great way to appeal to consumers.

36 & 37. Billie

Billie

Billie

Billie

Billie

These Billie ad examples use brightly colored photos of their products as their ad assets, and it works. The eye-catching photos grabs user attention as they scroll through their Facebook feed, making them pause to see what the fuss is all about.

38 & 39. Sonos

Sonos

Sonos

Sonos

Sonos

We love a good, clean design, and that’s exactly what we have here with these Sonos ads. With a simple look and a short, branded message, these are a couple of spot on ad designs.

40. Quay

Quay

Quay

This ad is simple but effective, showcasing a woman wearing a pair of their sunglasses. They also let users know right in the caption which specific pair these are in case they want to come back later and check them out, rather than clicking immediately.

41. Oliver Peoples

Oliver Peoples

Oliver Peoples

While this ad isn’t showing a finished product, sometimes the behind-the-scenes and the in-between can be fun for an audience to see as well.

42. Hydro Flask

Hydro Flask

Hydro Flask

We’re back with the bright colors in this Hydro Flask ad. This ad is perfectly using a rainbow color backdrop and similarly colored water bottles to grab attention and attract users to buy now.

43. Allbirds

Allbirds

Allbirds

This simple slideshow ad keeps to a monochromatic greyscale color theme by showcasing all of the various colors of this specific shoe. This is a great way to let viewers know that your brand is sure to have something for everyone.

44. Pipette Baby

Pipette

Pipette Baby

This Facebook ad example’s focus on pastel colors and clean design really catches their target audience’s eyes. Plus, the “So fresh + so clean” copy is going to stand out to any new or expecting mom.

Bottom line? Know what your audience wants to see and give it to them.

45 & 46. Stitch Fix

Stitch Fix

Stitch Fix

Stitch Fix

Stitch Fix

Stitch Fix has got their ad game right. Anytime someone browses some of the closet options on their site, they have a retargeting campaign that will then show the user Facebook ads based on their clothing preferences.

Genius, right? Now we might not all have the budget that Stitch Fix does, but retargeting ads don’t have to cost an arm and a leg, and they can be great at grabbing buyers who may not have been totally ready before.

47. Sperry

Sperry

Sperry

Sperry’s product ad here is another great example of showcasing a product next to that product in action. They let their audience get a glimpse into what they can do with the product without having to imagine it.

48. Warby Parker

Warby Parker

Warby Parker

Warby Parker’s simple product ad here showcases a few frames from their new collection against a clean, white linen. You can take this photo with your smartphone and still create an engaging Facebook ad.

49. World Market

World Market

World Market

This is a great ad from World Market showcasing several of their products within a single photo. It shows the massive selection that consumers can find, getting them ready to open their wallets and buy…a lot of items.

50. Artifact Uprising

Artifact Uprising

Artifact Uprising

This is a great product ad as it’s simple yet still so visually appealing. Showcasing a stunning travel photo book cover design against a plain background allows their product to stand out more.

51. LINJER

Linjer

LINJER

Really want to get people excited about your products? Host a giveaway! And to get even more entries and awareness about your business, you can create an ad surrounding your giveaway.

Best Lifestyle Facebook Ad Examples

Sometimes just showcasing your product isn’t enough to really get your audience excited. Instead, they need to see your product in action, and get a glimpse into the lifestyle they could have, if only they bought from your company.

This is why lifestyle Facebook ads are so effective. They’re not really selling a product – instead, they’re selling a way of life.

52 & 53. REI

REI

REI

REI

REI

These REI ads showcase stunning, real-life photos of their products in use. They’re saying, “Want to spend more time outdoors? You need REI.”

54 & 55. Urban Outfitters

Urban Outfitters

Urban Outfitters

Urban Outfitters

Urban Outfitters

Urban Outfitters’ ads showcase two more great examples of their products in action and how that could effectively improve their customers’ lives.

56. Quay

Quay

Quay

Want to really make someone want your product? Showcase a collaboration with a celebrity or influencer, like Quay did here with Lizzo.

If someone sees someone they admire using your product, they’re that much more likely to buy it for themselves.

57 & 58. Haus

Haus

Haus

Haus

Haus

These serene video ads appeal to the customer, making them want to be where the videos are, drinking these cocktails, too.

59 & 60. Parachute Home

Haus

Haus

Who doesn’t want to live in a home this cozy? Parachute’s ad examples give incredible insight into what their consumer’s lives and homes could look like if they only purchase their products.

61 & 62. The Sill

The Sill

The Sill

The Sill

The Sill

The Sill’s lifestyle ad showcases how green someone’s home could be, if only they found the perfect plant and accompanying planter. Don’t these photos look so homey and cozy? I bet their target audience thinks so too.

63. Hydro Flask

Hydro Flask

Hydro Flask

This photo isn’t even showcasing or focusing on a product at all. It shares information about a sale, but the background photo is all about the lifestyle of their consumers and making people want that to be them, too.

64. Allbirds

Allbirds

Allbirds

This Allbirds ad shows their target audience what their product can do and is a great example of a simple lifestyle video ad.

65. Airbnb

Airbnb

Airbnb

Anyone who knows Airbnb knows that they’re all about showcasing the lifestyle of both hosts and travelers. Sharing areas that Airbnb users can stay is a great way to draw people into their app and start booking.

66. Cosmopolitan

Cosmopolitan

Cosmopolitan

As a lifestyle brand, Cosmopolitan’s ad automatically falls under this category. We love the stunning red hair in this photo alongside the unique overlay of the text.

67. Sonos

Sonos

Sonos

Ah, what is a pool day without some good tunes to listen to? The lifestyle photo alongside the color blocking design makes this a plain good ad.

68. Billabong

Billabong

Billabong

Billabong’s ad example showcasing their eco-friendly collection has a feel-good aura around it. People want to feel better about their choices, and making an eco-friendly lifestyle and clothing choice is always a win.

69. Zara Home

Zara Home

Zara Home

The way that Zara Home is showcasing products in their element is the perfect example of a lifestyle ad.

These are all products that their audience can buy, and they’re getting a stunning preview into just what they could look like inside or outside their home.

70. Chipotle

Chipotle

Chipotle

Chipotle’s ad here plays to all kinds of different existing lifestyles, showing that anyone, from vegan to vegetarian to Paleo and more, can enjoy their food.
Best Facebook Ad Examples Focusing on AffordabilityMany times brands just want their audience to know that YES! You can afford their product.

Whether they showcase low prices, promote sales and discounts, or offer up perks and memberships, these Facebook ad examples showcase the cost surrounding each brand’s product.

71. Herbivore Botanicals

Herbivore Botanicals

Herbivore Botanicals

We love to see emojis used effectively in ad copy, and Herbivore Botanicals has gotten it right. Especially with its usage in combination with a free shipping deal and stunning photo, everything about this ad works.

72. The North Face

The North Face

The North Face

If you’re running a discount or promotion for various holidays, you absolutely want to create an ad campaign surrounding that. The ROI from additional awareness of your sale will nearly always be worth it.

73. Dunkin

Dunkin

Dunkin

Heavy copy doesn’t always work in a Facebook ad, but in this example where Dunkin is thoroughly explaining their perks program, it’s necessary.

Less is typically more, unless you need the verbiage to give your audience a more thorough understanding.

74 & 75. Postmates

Postmates

Postmates

Postmates

Postmates

These unique graphics help initially grab attention, but it’s the discounts that are ultimately going to reel the customers in.

And including a promo code right in your ad is a great way to get people to take action immediately – they don’t want to forget about this discount.

76. Brooklinen

Brooklinen

Brooklinen

Bedding is not a cheap investment, but Brooklinen’s focus on fair prices and their 25% off bundles can really help take the edge off when someone needs new sheets or a comforter.

77 & 78. MeUndies

MeUndies

MeUndies

MeUndies

MeUndies

This ad by MeUndies is all about promoting their membership plan to help their customers save. If you have a unique program or membership plan, creating a campaign to showcase it is always a good idea.

79. World Market

World Market

World Market

The “HUGE savings” copy in this ad will always grab someone’s attention and make them look further into a product or brand, especially if they’re in need of what the ad is selling.

80 & 81. Feather

Feather

Feather

Feather

Feather

We love the transparent pricing in these ads, plus the free delivery. By pointing to each product in the video and giving their prices right on the spot, someone who might be in the market for furniture rental will be all ears.

82 & 83. Spotify

Spotify

Spotify

Spotify

Spotify

Spotify’s brightly colored ads pop off the page and grab users’ eyes. However, it’s the 3 months of Spotify Premium for free that will really rope new customers in.

84. Everlane

Everlane

Everlane

A simple lifestyle photo accompanied with a 10% off discount for first-time buyers is sometimes all you need to generate the response you’re looking for.

85. Joybird

Joybird

Joybird

This relatable copy mixed with an exclusive 35% off discount and a stunning pink room is absolutely the way to sell furniture – or, anything, really.

86. Tender Greens

Tender Greens

Tender Greens

Just in case you missed their 10% off discount in the ad copy, Tender Greens has made sure you won’t miss it in their ad’s animation. Repetition is often a great advertising technique to ensure your audience remembers what you’re offering.

87. Pipette Baby

Pipette Baby

Pipette Baby

This is a compelling ad because they’ve included a photo of everything their target audience could buy in this summer bundle alongside a 30% off sale. It’s transparent and a beautifully designed ad to boot.

88. Asana

Asana

Asana

Offering a free trial can also be a compelling ad to run. We also love the flat, colorful design in this ad graphic, appealing to Asana’s target customer.

Best Service-Focused Facebook Ad Examples

Not every brand sells products and not every ad needs to be product-focused. We’ve put together a list of our favorite B2B and service-based Facebook ad examples to showcase how these guys are also winning at digital advertising.

89. Asana

Asana

Asana

Asana again! This video ad showing a quick overview of how their service works is a great way to get people interested. They’re showing off their user-friendly interface to entice people looking for easy-to-use project management software.

90. Duolingo

Duolingo

Duolingo

Duolingo isn’t B2B by any means, but their app does provide a service, and with this cute animation and their #1 Education App copy, this ad is doing a lot to promote said service.

91 & 92. Canva

Canva

Canva

Canva

Canva

This is another great example of a SaaS ad, giving a sneak peek into how their software is used and what can be created with it.

93. Sprout Social

Sprout Social

Sprout Social

Sprout Social is a well-known social media management SaaS, and this ad is designed to help them generate leads to nurture and eventually convince them to sign up for their software.

Starting out with a lead generation ad is a great tactic for many types of B2B and SaaS businesses.

94. Salesforce

Salesforce

Salesforce

Salesforce is another SaaS company that helps sales teams keep their contacts and leads organized. This cute illustration promoting a webinar – another lead generation tactic – helps to grab attention while people scroll down their Facebook feed.

95. Grammarly

Grammarly

Grammarly

Grammarly’s ad is a very simple tutorial of how their product works, and anyone who could use some help with spelling or grammar is likely to immediately hit that Download button.

96 & 97. Unfold

Unfold

Unfold

Unfold

Unfold

These two Unfold apps don’t necessarily showcase the how-to of its app, but rather the outcome. These stunning templates and designs are accessible by their users, and that in itself is a great incentive.

Best Testimonial Facebook Ad Examples

Another great way to sell your product or service through your Facebook ads is by sharing social proof, or customer reviews and testimonials.

83% of people trust reviews over ads, so putting them together is a winning combination.

98 & 99. Buffy

Buffy

Buffy

Buffy

Buffy

These Buffy ads use direct quotes from customers in their ad graphics, showcasing that real people are using and loving their product.

100. Nixit

Nixit

Nixit

Not only will the bold colors in this Nixit ad grab attention, but the testimonials directly in the ad video give even more credibility to their product and their brand.

101. Warby Parker

Warby Parker

Warby Parker

This Warby Parker ad showcases a video review from one of their customers on how the process works, creating an authentic ad that will attract new buyers.

102 & 103. Calm

Calm

Calm

Calm

Calm

Not only do these Calm ads include reviews from their users, the ad on the right shares awards and accolades the app has gotten from reputable sources as well, giving even more credibility to this app and how well it works.

104. Curology

Curology

Curology

Working with influencers to get reviews for your product or service is another great way to showcase social proof for your audience, just like Curology did here.

105. Artifact Uprising

Artifact Uprising

Artifact Uprising

This Artifact Uprising ad is unique in that it isn’t even created from Artifact Uprising’s account. Instead, this is another example of an influencer campaign, where the influencer tagged the brand, and the brand promoted the post.

106. Brooklinen

Brooklinen

Brooklinen

The social proof here is subtle – it’s in the title line of their ad information. “50,000+ 5-star reviews don’t lie” is a great tagline to help sell your product and build trust.

107. Winc

Winc

Winc

This ad has everything – bright colors, emojis, a direct customer quote, and a 50% off your first order promotion. We love to see it.

Best Facebook Ad Examples With Awesome Copy

While most people focus more on ad visuals, sometimes the copy is actually the driving force is helping customers make a decision. Here are a few awesome Facebook ad examples where it’s all about the ad copy.

108. Madewell

Madewell

Madewell

This simple and casual copy shows that you don’t always have to be clever or hip in what you’re writing. Just be real with your audience.

109. Headspace

Headspace

Headspace

The copy in this Headspace ad is simple, straight to the point, and focuses 100% on the customer. And for an app focusing on self care and mental health, they’ve done a fantastic job here.

110. Magic Spoon Cereal

Magic Spoon

Magic Spoon

We’re loving the use of emoji to add visuals into the copy in this Magic Spoon Cereal ad, as well as sharing the direct benefits of their cereal. Any parent trying to get healthy breakfast foods for their kids will instantly be intrigued.

111. Winc

Winc

Winc

Inject some personality into your copy like we see here in this Winc ad. It incites a small chuckle out of their reader, making them that much more likely to click that Get Offer button.

112. TOMS

Toms

Toms

The copy in this TOMS ad is all about exclusivity. Love these shoes? Buy them now, before supplies sell out and you’ve lost your chance.

113 & 114. Purple Carrot

Purple Carrot

Purple Carrot

Purple Carrot

Purple Carrot

You’ve got a problem. Purple Carrot has the solution. That’s the exact style of this ad copy and it’s incredibly effective.Best Abstract Facebook Ad Examples

You don’t always have to have a clear concept or visual in your Facebook ad. If you want to try something outside the box, go ahead and do it!

These ad examples showcase a few other brands using abstract visuals and videos to promote their products or services.

115. Nike

Nike

Nike

Did you know that there’s a shoe in that graphic? It took me a second, too.

But that’s exactly why this abstract design is so effective – it makes the user take pause to figure out what is going on, and once Nike has their attention, they’re much more likely to buy.

116. Airbnb

Airbnb

Airbnb

This ad incorporates real video clips with abstract elements like animations, illustrations, shapes and more, and creates a stunning and effective video ad.

117 & 118. Slack

Slack

Slack

Slack

Slack

Slack is a team communication tool, and these abstract visuals do nothing to accurately depict their platform. But that’s exactly why they work – they’re cool looking, and they do the job of getting people to stop and look.

119. Harmless Harvest

Harmless Harvest

Harmless Harvest

This is another great example of using real photos with abstract design elements, like color blocking, cutout fruit, text blocks and more.

120. Hydro Flask

Hydro Flask

Hydro Flask

This monochromatic, geometric ad is using stunning graphic design and bright colors to attract viewers and get them wanting to buy.

Best Facebook Ad Examples Focusing on Current Events

Whether brands are taking a stand, sharing information on current events, or helping out with movements or charities, creating ads around these movements can be an effective way of inciting change.

Here are a few great Facebook ad examples that are doing just that.

121. Coca-Cola

Coca-Cola

Coca-Cola

In wake of recent events, protests, movements and more, Coca-Cola is letting their audience know exactly where they stand and how they plan to help people take action.

122, 123, & 124. Ben & Jerry’s

Ben & Jerry's

Ben & Jerry’s

Ben & Jerry's

Ben & Jerry’s

Ben & Jerry's

Ben & Jerry’s

Ben and Jerry’s is well known for taking a strong stance on social issues across the board.

Their use of illustration here makes the topics more approachable and easy to understand, but they’re still doing a great job in informing audience members and taking action.

125 & 126. Converse

Converse

Converse

Converse

Converse

These two ads showcase Converse’s support of Pride month and the LGTBQ+ community, going as far as creating pride-centered products and giving all proceeds from these products to relevant charities.

This shows they’re putting their money where their mouth is and gives them credibility in this support.

127, 128, & 129. The New Yorker

The New Yorker

The New Yorker

The New Yorker

The New Yorker

The New Yorker

The New Yorker

The New Yorker’s ads feature unapologetic headlines to keep their target audience up-to-date on current issues. Their famous cover illustrations can be seen featured within their ads, enticing potential subscribers.

130. The Citizenry

The Citizenry

The Citizenry

The Citizenry’s Earth Day initiative makes for a great ad. Looking to give back to the community or to the planet? Create an ad campaign around your initiative to help spread the word.

131. Gap

Gap

Gap

With the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, many big brands are starting to create and sell cloth masks. This helps face coverings become even more easily accessible for the general population during a time of need.

Additional Facebook Ad Examples

132. CoSchedule – Facts That Nobody Can Ignore

CoSchedule’s ad gets so many things right that it has totally earned its place as our first Facebook ad example.

The ad’s colorful design pops into your eyes right from the News Feed, making CoSchedule’s logo memorable while increasing the brand awareness.

CoSchedule’s Facebook ad gets so many things right

CoSchedule’s Facebook ad gets so many things right

The Facebook ad reads: “20,000+ marketers and bloggers use the CoSchedule editorial calendar to plan ahead and save time.

Et voila, in this one sentence, they’ve managed to establish trust, target a specific audience, and reveal the benefit of their product.

Key Takeaways:

  1. Numbers and facts work: People are wired to like even numbers. Mentioning the number of people using your product builds instant trust. It’s your way to say, “We’re already the top product in this category, so you should try it too.”
  2. Lure in with the benefit: CoSchedule’s ad starts with a question — “Ready to get your marketing organized?” — that not only implies they will get your marketing organized, but that the only thing preventing that outcome is your hesitation. By promising a benefit relevant to your target audience, they might be interested to learn more about your offer.
  3. Explain the “how”: People who haven’t tried your product have no clue how it works. Simply saying, “It’ll save you time” may not be sufficient. You could improve your ad by explaining how your product helps to achieve the promised benefits. CoSchedule’s ad displays an image of the editorial calendar that’s going to deliver the benefits.

133. FreshBooks – Focused Niche Ads Steal the Show

FreshBooks’ Facebook ad starts by saying: “FreshBooks makes online accounting easy so you can stay focused on running your business.”

With this one sentence, the ad clearly states who the target audience is: people who spend too much time on accounting instead of being managing their business. Sounds like small business owners, doesn’t it?

FreshBooks’s Facebook ad has a clear target audience

FreshBooks’ Facebook ad has a clear target audience

The other great thing about this ad is the ad image: it presents a setup where people find themselves every day (in their workstation, accompanied by a large cup of coffee), which makes it relatable to the ad viewer.

Key Takeaways:

  1. Speak to a niche audience: Decide who you want to target with your ad and be crystal clear about it. Not only does defining your market segment help you choose the right message, tone and language, you’ll also know whom to target with your Facebook ads.
  2. Dare to exclude people: You can’t be liked by everyone. And to earn a niche audience’s attention, you need to speak directly to them. FreshBooks’ ad headline says clearly: “Online Accounting Software for Non-Accountants”. That’s it. Everyone who relates to this title may feel as if the ad is speaking directly to them.
  3. Colors matter: Do you remember the last ad that caught your attention in the Facebook news feed? Chances are that it was brightly colored and highly contrasted. Research has found that people make up their minds within 90 seconds of their initial interactions with either people or products. About 62‐90% of their assessment is based on colors alone. So yes, you should probably create more colorful Facebook ads if you haven’t done that already.

Here’s another location-specific ad example by WebSummit. It tells directly whom it’s targeting: Austrian startups.

Web Summit’s Facebook ad uses location-based personalization

Web Summit’s Facebook ad uses location-based personalization

134. SumoMe – Show the Results

What could be a better tactic than explaining your product’s benefit in your ads? Showing it.

Images tell stories, and studies have shown that stories work because our brains are primed to heed their advice.

This Facebook ad example by SumoMe displays a growth chart without any clear explanations. There isn’t any obvious information explaining what this chart signifies.

People looking at it might assume it symbolizes growth, however, and that’s exactly what SumoMe wants: to be associated with success.

SumoMe's impressive growth chart for their business

SumoMe’s impressive growth chart for their business

Imagine this ad in your News Feed. There’s a good chance that seeing a growth chart would make you curious to find out what it’s about and click through to their website. Now that’s what we call smart marketing.

Key Takeaways:

  1. Use symbols to your advantage: People are quick to associate your brand with positive or negative feelings. Studies show that people rely on emotions rather than information to make brand decisions. By mentioning or showing symbols in your Facebook ads, you’ll establish a link in the brain between the symbol and your brand.
  2. If this, then that: Nope, we’re not talking about the popular productivity tool, but you’re close. SumoMe’s ad text reads, “If you want viral growth you need this tool”. What happens is that people think, “Yes, I want viral growth,” and are immediately presented with SumoMe’s software as a solution. First, mention something that you think potential target audiences might need. Then present your product as the best possible solution.
  3. Add a pinch of social proof: Just like numbers work magic, so does data-driven social proof. “Over 175,000 websites grow their traffic with SumoMe” – that may be just enough proof the reader needs to check out the product.

135. 17hats – Make It Personal

As weird as it might sound, people like looking at other people’s faces on the web. When they feel like someone’s gazing at them, they can’t resist finding out more.

17hats’ Facebook ad uses a hero shot with a happy young lady, creating positive emotions and helping their target audience relate to their offer.

17hats Utilized Hero Shots in Their Facebook Ads

17hats Utilized Hero Shots in Their Facebook Ads

Key Takeaways:

  1. Start with a question: An open-ended question that resonates with your target audience is a good place to start your ad copy. Research by Outbrain showed that article titles ending with a question mark tend to have higher click-through rates than those ending with an exclamation mark or full stop.
  2. Cut right to the problem: 17hats’ ad headline says, “Tame the Chaos of Running Your Business.” Showing that they understand their audience’s pain points gives 17hats the chance to offer a solution while people are still listening.
  3. Hero shots work: According to research by Psychological Science, seeing a smiling person makes us feel happy, comfortable and safe. Our brains have developed the Picture Superiority Effect, meaning that concepts are much more likely to be remembered if they are presented as pictures rather than words.

When choosing an image for your Facebook ad, however, avoid overused stock photos as people are growing immune to them. It might be worth organizing a photoshoot to collect authentic photos for all future marketing tactics.

136. Safari – Start Doing

Safari’s Facebook ad reads: “Start your free trial today.”“Read comfortably right on your phone”“Get personalized recommendations.”

This is one of the most actionable ad examples we’ve seen. Safari’s ad includes a total of six action verbs:

  • Start
  • Gain
  • Read
  • Save
  • Get
  • Achieve

Calls to action are often placed to drive people to starting engaging or completing an action immediately.

Safari Facebook Ad Includes Many Action Verbs

Safari Facebook Ad Includes Many Action Verbs

Key Takeaways:

  1. Action verbs in ad copy: By adding action verbs to your ad copy, you could make it more actionable and energizing for the reader. The decision-making part of our brain also happens to be the most primitive, making it act on simple and actionable words.
  2. Make them remember your logo: People might not remember your brand by name, but they’re a lot more likely to recall the visual image of your logo. A study by the University of Iowa compared hearing memory to visual memory and found that we’re hardwired to remember things we see many times longer than what we hear.
  3. Make it about them: Did you notice how Safari’s ad addresses the reader as “You”? Everything they suggest is targeted at the reader, declaring that the maximum benefit of the product is for the person reading the ad, not the brand.

Need more action verbs? Buffer has put together a massive list of 189 magnetic words that make your copywriting almost impossible to resist.

137. Try The World – Let Them Almost Feel it

Try The World’s ad depicts the moment when someone receives their subscription box full of exotic foods.

You can almost feel the excitement of receiving this mystical box of goodies and opening it as it were a treasure chest or a gift from a secret admirer. People seeing the ad might want to experience similar excitement and joy.

An article in the Wall Street Journal suggests that it takes up to 20 minutes for that feeling of excitement to pass. That’s more than enough time to lead a happy prospect through your sales funnel.

The products look attractive and desirable, contributing to the decision to get one of these subscription boxes ASAP.

Try the World‘s Facebook ad - the joy of opening gifts

Try the World‘s Facebook ad – the joy of opening gifts

Key Takeaways:

  1. Make it almost graspable: Showcase your product at the most exciting moment of its lifecycle. If Try The World’s ad pictured the subscription box in the post office or unopened on the dinner table, they’d be missing out on a great opportunity to engage emotionally and reach beyond rational thinking.
  2. Free extra: The promise made in the Facebook ad’s headline says, “Free Paris Box with your Thailand Box!” If you were unsure about ordering the subscription before, now you’re almost convinced you’re getting a great bargain. When the online store 2BigFeet introduced free shipping for orders over $100, their conversions went up 50%. Free extras can be the right nudge to help people make the final decision to purchase the product.
  3. Exclamation marks FTW: Did you notice the exclamation mark at the end of the ad headline? That’s no coincidence. Exclamation marks make us more alert and attentive to messages. That being said, don’t abuse exclamation marks either. As New York Magazine’s The Science of Us writer Melissa Dahl pointed out, “The exclamation mark, once reserved for expressing joy or excitement, now simply marks baseline politeness.” In other words, hacks only work if you don’t overexploit them.

138. Nike – Don’t Be Afraid of Contrast

Nike’s Facebook ad is so colorful that it looks like an oasis in a desert of dull Facebook posts.

A UsabilityTools study showed that using highly contrasting landing page call-to-actions resulted in a 75% higher click-through rate, compared to a low-contrast CTA.

Nike’s Facebook Ad Is High on Contrast

Nike’s Facebook Ad Is High on Contrast

High-contrast websites, ads, and other marketing materials help to draw people’s attention to your offer. However, you need to support your colorful image with a worthy ad copy; otherwise, all your effort has gone to waste.

Key takeaways:

  1. Use contrasting color combinations: Higher contrast can help draw more attention to your ad. It’s not only the red and pink contributing to Nike’s ad success; the white font and background forms a perfect harmony of colors. A Science Direct study examining consumer preferences found that while a large majority of consumers prefer color patterns with similar hues, they favor palettes with a highly contrasting accent color. Use a color wheel to determine which colors match the best.
  2. Include a link: While your entire Facebook ad is clickable, there might be people who are unaware of it. Nike has included a website URL in the ad copy as a clickable call-to-action, and people will remember the link longer after seeing it.
  3. Create carousel ads: A Kinetic Social report revealed that carousel ads have up to 10 times higher click-through rates compared to static sponsored posts on Facebook. Carousel ads can display up to 10 products/offers instead of a single one, so there is a better chance at least one image will resonate with the viewer.

139. AdStage – Use the Glory of Influencers

AdStage’s Facebook ad for an upcoming webinar includes the titles and photos of two marketing experts as a form of social proof — proving that they actually exist.

According to KISSmetrics, people are more likely to be persuaded by others similar to them.

AdStage’s main audience seems to be marketing professionals, so it makes a lot of sense to use industry experts for building trust and brand recognition.

AdStage includes influencers in Facebook ad campaigns

AdStage includes influencers in Facebook ad campaigns

When you include influencers in your marketing campaigns, make win-win deals for both parties.

For AdStage, organizing a webinar means higher brand awareness among marketers. For the two experts, it’s a chance to establish themselves as authorities in a given field.

Key Takeaways:

  1. Strike a deal with influencers: Including influencers in your marketing campaigns gives your brand a touch of their glory and fame. According to some resources, sharing branded content via influencers results in 3x-10x higher conversion rates.
  2. Bring hashtags to Facebook: Twitter is the undisputed master, but Facebook also supports the use of hashtags. Did you know that searching for a hashtag on Facebook leads to a feed with related images and posts?
  3. Start with low-threat offers: Every time you ask people to sign up for a subscription or buy something from you, you’re asking them to take a chance on you. Before you can ask people to spend money on your products, you need to earn their trust. Not all offers match with your target audience’s familiarity with your brand and the PPC channel temperature.

When advertising to cold audiences, keep your offers helpful and non-binding. Asking people to join a webinar is by far less binding than asking them to use your product. Other opportunities can include sharing blog articles, offering free eBooks, or giving away free monthly subscriptions.

140. Soylent – Eliminate Doubts

You may have heard of Soylent. You also might have heard stories about its horrible taste. But do you know what it actually tastes like?

Soylent’s ad starts by proclaiming the most popular question asked from them: “But what does it taste like?”

That’s a smart move — it shows their marketing team’s genuine interest in what customers are thinking about.

Soylent Facebook Ad - What Does it Taste Like?

Soylent Facebook Ad – What Does it Taste Like?

Right after grabbing people’s attention, the Facebook ad offers a solution: Order Soylent and find out what it really tastes like.

Key Takeaways:

  1. Address doubts and possible counterfacts: Soylent addresses the relevant pain point — “I’ve heard that Soylent tastes bad” — by hinting that it might taste like cereal milk, almonds, or Graham crackers. Moreover, it offers a solution to the question.
  2. Talk to a friend: The ad addresses the reader –- you — in a friendly and familiar tone. Instead of relying on the power of the masses, this ad personalizes the message with a singular focus on the person reading it.
  3. Play with people’s curiosity: By framing your product like an unsolved mystery, you’ll make people anxious to find out the answer to the puzzle.

A Caltech study showed that curiosity increases to a point as knowledge increases, but then it drops off. You want people to know part of the story, but leave them some mystery to investigate.

141. Shopify – Offer Something Worthwhile

Shopify’s ad asks: “What kind of person do you say you are to the world?

People have an innate wish to be praised and valued for the traits they consider the most important. Shopify suggests that with their help, you can be the person you’ve always wanted to be.

Helping someone shape their life is a strong (and bold) selling point.

Shopify’s Facebook ad offers to change your life

Shopify’s Facebook ad offers to change your life

Key Takeaways:

  1. Ask a personal question: If you can get people to think about the course of their lives, you’re onto something big. As someone thinks about your question, they might give more thought to the benefits of your product.
  2. Remind people of what is possible: Shopify’s ad motivates people to reconsider their chosen life path by asking, “What’s your next move?” It suggests that there is always an opportunity to change and offers the means to do it (Build Your Store on FB!).
  3. “Sign Up” call-to-action: While most Facebook ad examples use the “Learn More” CTA, Shopify is straightforward and asks people to sign up at once.

While A/B testing Facebook ads, Scoro discovered that the ad with the “Sign Up” CTA outperformed the ad with the “Learn More” CTA by 14.5%. When creating Facebook ads, don’t lose sight of your final goal – conversions.

While people are more likely to click on the “Learn More” call-to-action, they’ll convert at a higher rate after having clicked the “Sign Up” CTA.

142. Surface – Compare Yourself to Competitors

Surface’s Facebook ad example includes the text, “Surface Book comes with Pen, touch and nearly 2 million more pixels than a MacBook Pro 13.”

This is why adding the statement could be considered a smart move for the brand.

For once, Surface says that it has considerably more pixels than its main competitor: MacBook Pro 13.

By mentioning the MacBook in their ad, they take advantage of their competitor’s fame.

Simply describing the number of pixels in their PC wouldn’t tell most ad viewers a thing — but comparing the number to the well-known MacBook Pro establishes a strong anchor point for the comparison.

Surface has 2 million more pixels than a MacBook Pro

Surface has 2 million more pixels than a MacBook Pro

Key Takeaways:

  1. Outshine your competitors: Studies show that our brains prefer recognizable brands. If your product is better than those famous competitors, don’t be afraid to say so. (Just so you know, this hack only works if your products truly are better than those of your biggest competitors, which is subjective.)
  2. Show your product: If you aren’t sure what to showcase on your Facebook ad image, including your product might be a good idea. People will get a glimpse of how it looks and, if they like what they see, are more likely to try it out.
  3. Offer savings: Price savings could be the final nudge that people need to complete your desired action. Even better, if you add a time limit to your offer, the sense of urgency makes it more tempting to capitalize on the offer.

143. KlientBoost – Get A Black Belt In Emojis

At KlientBoost, we’re a complete fan club of emojis. I mean, who could resist a Santa emoji winking from the Facebook news feed?

SaaS startup Scoro ran a small A/B test to see how emojis affect Facebook ads’ click-through rate. They discovered that the ad with a red flag emoji in the headline had the CTR of 0.846%, while the ad with no emoji had the CTR of 0.351%.

As you might have noticed, our fave emoji is

As you might have noticed, our fave emoji is

Key Takeaways:

  1. Use more emojis: Emojis are a great way to spice up your ad copy, and can increase your Facebook ads’ CTR. Use Emojipedia to find copies of the emojis you need.
  2. Text on the image: If you’re careful not to cross Facebook’s rule against text-heavy ad images, this can work to your advantage. Advertising legend David Ogilvy commissioned research that discovered people typically look at the image first, even before scanning the headline. Using text on an image could help to make more people notice your message.
  3. Test fun ideas: It’s safe to say that our holiday calendar of marketing gifographics was the first of its kind. People love novelty, and you can use this knowledge to your advantage by putting your effort into creating high-quality content to share on Facebook. Testing new ideas might be a good way to earn people’s attention and drive more traffic to your website.

144. Asana – Product = Benefit

Asana’s message“Get Asana. Get Results.” — cuts straight to the point.

In four words, the ad boldly states that the product will provide a great outcome.

Asana uses an eye-catching slogan in their Facebook ad

Asana uses an eye-catching slogan in their Facebook ad

Key Takeaways:

  1. Use a clear slogan: A good slogan should deliver a clear message, not just pretty words. When you’re writing copy for your Facebook ad campaigns, only make promises that you can keep.
  2. Keep it short: Asana’s ads link description only has five words: “Free for teams of 15.” The message doesn’t overshadow the ad’s headline, delivers actionable information, and defines the target market – teams looking for product management systems. (Not bad for five words!)
  3. Improve the current situation: Show your audience that you know where they stand and their main pain points. Then, offer to improve their current situation. If you look at the ad copy of Asana’s Facebook ad example, that’s the exact tactic they’ve applied.

145. Mailchimp – Provide Specific Details

Here’s another example from MailChimp that shows how their product works:

MailChimp’s Facebook ad shows exactly how their product works

MailChimp’s Facebook ad shows exactly how their product works

Key Takeaways:

  1. Create visual interest: Describing the functionality of your email automation system doesn’t scream “interesting”. But when you build your ad around a hat-wearing purple monkey figurine, users are more likely to investigate.
  2. Use negative space: Because the ad’s image is so strong, MailChimp is content to leave most of the ad space empty, drawing your eye even more intently to the image.

146. AdEspresso – Explain Your Product with Video Ads

AdEspresso’s Facebook ad shows a one-minute video describing their product’s benefits and features.

Instead of clicking on the ad to go to the product’s landing page, people can get an overview of AdEspresso’s features without leaving Facebook.

AdEspresso’s Facebook ad uses a captioned video

AdEspresso’s Facebook ad uses a captioned video

According to Adobe, shoppers that watch videos are 1.81 times more likely to make a purchase, in comparison to non-video viewers.

When analyzing the ROI of video ads, Kinetic Social found that video ads have the lowest effective cost per click (eCPC), with an average eCPC of $0.18.

If you have an introductory video of your product, create an A/B test where it’s used in place of your Facebook ad image. The results might surprise you…

Key Takeaways:

  1. Replace images with videos: Video ads are just as easy to create as the regular image ads. Simply go to Facebook Ads Manager, create a new campaign, and upload a video instead of the image.
  2. Keep the videos short: After analyzing millions of videos, Wistia discovered that people typically watch more than 80% of a video shorter than 30 seconds. As the video length increases, however, the engagement drops. Get to your strongest selling point in the first 20 seconds so that people won’t pause your ad too soon.
  3. Always add captions: Each video in the Facebook news feed is soundless by default. To get your message to the people, add captions to all the videos shared on the social media platform.

According to Facebook, captioned video ads increase video view time by an average of 12%. In one study of Facebook video ads, 41% of videos were almost meaningless without sound.

147. Neil Patel – Build on Your Personal Brand

Neil Patel is one of the top marketing influencers on the internet. He’s built four multimillion-dollar businesses and advised tons of startups.

His Facebook post says: “Not only have I helped grow companies like Amazon, NBC, GM, HP, and Viacom, I’ve…

Here’s a guy who knows what he’s talking about. And he makes it clear that everybody values his experience.

Neil Patel’s Facebook ad uses his personal brand

Neil Patel’s Facebook ad uses his personal brand

Key Takeaways:

  1. Use your personal brand: According to Fast Company, creating a strong personal brand establishes you as a natural leader and opens doors. If your company’s CEO is a publicly known expert, reflect their halo onto your product. Build on your CEO’s personal brand until your product takes off on its own.
  2. Use facts to build trust: As previously mentioned, the best way to establish your brand or yourself as an influencer is to support the statement with facts. Patel lists all his achievements to prove to readers he knows what he’s talking about.
  3. Deliver the expertise: Noticed how Neil lists his achievements before he asks you to join his webinar? By doing so, he’s offering to share information that by now you believe to be invaluable expertise. On top of that, it’s completely free.

According to a behavioral scientist Robert Cialdini, we prefer to say “yes” to those we know and like. Building on an influencers’ personal brand makes people more ready to accept your offer.

148. Unbounce – Simplify the Process

Unbounce’s Facebook ad hints that they can deliver conversions in five simple steps.

The simplicity of the process is there before you, loud and clear, marked by five colorful icons.

Unbounce's Facebook Ad Brings a Refreshing Simplicity

Unbounce’s Facebook Ad Brings a Refreshing Simplicity

Key Takeaways:

  1. Simplify, simplify, simplify: If your ads are too complicated to understand in a few seconds, people give up as quickly as they started reading in the first place. Sometimes it makes sense to leave some ideas unmentioned in the ad and explain everything in depth on your landing page. A study showed that 59% of people actually never read more than the headline of a Facebook share, so yes, you want to be brief.
  2. Icons give more structure: The five icons in Unbounce’s ad draw attention and help structure the ad’s message. As KISSmetrics puts it: “Icons help give users a point of reference – particularly when navigating a site or when scrolling and scanning over a page.”
  3. Promise a quick win: If there was an easy five-step method to double your leads, every marketer would jump on it. We all know that there are no such shortcuts, but we’re still intrigued by the promise of an effortless achievement.

149. Wrike – Get the Benefit Without the Problem

Wrike’s Facebook ad asks: “Getting dozens of new work requests without the details you need?” Then it offers a simple solution: “Simplify the way you manage and prioritize work requests.”

This ad’s text implies that they can deliver the benefit — without the problem.

Wrike’s Facebook ad shows they understand the reader’s problem

Wrike’s Facebook ad shows they understand the reader’s problem

Key Takeaways:

  1. Describe the problem: Find your target audience’s greatest pain points and offer the medicine to their problems. Wrike’s Facebook ad shows that they understand the struggle of getting too many work requests, which makes them more qualified to offer a solution to this problem.
  2. Pop in some uncommon words: Wrike’s ad asks, “Is your team bombarded with new requests?” People aren’t used to seeing peculiar words like bombarded in Facebook ads, so they look like a novelty and help catch people’s attention.
  3. Find a compelling UVP: Your Unique Value Offer is your strongest selling point, the one you’d recite during a 30-second elevator pitch. Your UVP should convince people that they need your product and its benefit.

According to ConversionXL, a good value proposition:

  • explains how your product solves customers’ problems or improves their situation (relevancy),
  • delivers specific benefits (quantified value),
  • tells the ideal customer why they should buy from you and not from the competition (unique differentiation).

150. Marketo – Enter New Leads into Your Sales Funnel

Marketo’s ad isn’t a regular Facebook ad; it’s a Facebook Lead Ad.

Lead Ads give people a quick way to opt into things like newsletters, quotes, and offers without leaving the Facebook news feed.

All you need to do is enter your contact details in exchange for the goods.

Use Facebook Lead Ads to collect new leads like Marketo

Use Facebook Lead Ads to collect new leads like Marketo

As someone clicks anywhere but the Download button, they’ll land on Marketo’s lead generation landing page. In a way, Facebook Lead Ads could potentially let you double down on the chances of getting new prospects.

Do Lead Ads work? AdEspresso ran an experiment and discovered that compared to regular eBook promotion campaigns, lead ads had a slightly higher cost-per-lead ($0.93 vs. $0.95).

Key Takeaways:

  1. Collect emails with Lead Ads: If your goal is to get more leads to your sales funnel, start a Facebook Lead Ads campaign. You can either promote a free guide, email course, webinar or other helpful materials.
  2. Share timely content: The ad’s headline starts with the year 2016. This assures people that the guide is relevant and timely, including the latest trends and hacks.
  3. Repeat your call-to-action: Marketo’s Facebook ad says Download three times — in the ad image, on the call-to-action button, and in the link description.

The Rule of 7 states that a prospect needs to “hear” the advertiser’s message at least seven times before they’ll take action to buy that product or service. While seven repetitions are clearly too much for a Facebook ad, three could be the golden formula.

151. SurveyMonkey – Everybody Loves Prizes

SurveyMonkey wants you to take their surveys. In return, they’re offering a chance to win a $300 Playstation Gift Card or other high-value prizes.

Giving away rewards works in multiple ways. First, they’ll get people to answer surveys uploaded by others in need.

But there’s another hidden goal: whenever someone takes a survey, they’ll remember SurveyMonkey as a go-to tool for creating online polls.

SurveyMonkey’s Facebook ad offers a prize

SurveyMonkey’s Facebook ad offers a prize

Key Takeaways:

  1. Offer a good prize: When dealing with cold audiences, offering a prize with significant value may be the key to their attention. Also, test prize offers in remarketing and low-commitment campaigns.
  2. Don’t set the bar too high: It’s natural that if you’re giving something away for free, you expect to get something in return. But if you ask people for too big of a commitment, they just won’t do it. If SurveyMonkey asked people to take 30 surveys for a chance to win a prize, few would do it — but as they keep the number of surveys low, people will look at it as a fair bargain.
  3. Display the prize: If you want to nudge people in the direction of your wished goal, let them see the prize in your Facebook ad image. Visual cues stay on top of mind longer than any messages. What’s more, contests may help to get people excited and more ready to share the Facebook post with their friends.

152. Ahrefs – Gamble with Curiosity

Do you know how long it takes for a new page to rank in Google Top10?

We do, because we clicked on this ad by Ahrefs and read the entire study.

Alright, we’ll tell you: Only 5.7% of all newly published pages will get to Google’s Top 10 within a year.

Ahrefs' Facebook ad is hard to resist

Ahrefs’ Facebook ad is hard to resist

Ahrefs’ Facebook ad presents an original case study that tells a story, which people love. Check the likes counter below the post.

Key Takeaways:

  1. Share blog content: Facebook ads can be used for many purposes, from gathering leads to earning your prospects’ attention. Blog promotions are low-threat campaigns that tell people who you are, and convince them that you’re the expert in whatever you’re doing.
  2. Create fascinating articles: Not every 800-word copycat article will make it through the noise. Consumers are smart enough to tell a gem from a pile of junk. When you share noteworthy stuff on Facebook, it’ll distribute organically via the likes and shares of your target audience. And according to a Nielsen study, 83% of people say they trust the recommendations of friends and family.
  3. Use a cliffhanger: A cliffhanger is an information gap that people can’t help but explore. The recipe to an effective cliffhanger is simple: Tell a compelling story, but leave it unresolved. That’s exactly what Ahrefs does by leaving their study’s answer hidden until you click and find out.

Gerard Zaltman, the author of How Customers Think: Essential Insights into the Mind of the Market, found that 95% of cognition happens outside of our conscious brain and inside our subconscious, emotional brain.

Thinking of a story lights up our emotional brains, which is where we make our buying decisions.

153. Blue Apron – Before and After

Blue Apron’s Facebook ad presents two versions of their product – the before and after.

The image on the left displays one of their subscription boxes. The image on the right shows the result of cooking the box’s ingredients.

Your mind will put together the rest of the story, adding the perceived joy of cooking and spending time with friends.

Blue Apron's Facebook ad shows ingredients and the result

Blue Apron’s Facebook ad shows ingredients and the result

Blue Apron has put some real effort into the images, as they know that delicious-looking fresh food is a crucial selling point.

Key Takeaways:

  1. Show the before and after: If your product needs to be unpacked or prepared in some way or another, it makes a lot of sense to let people see both of these phases. Showcasing a closed subscription box or a pile of Legos could potentially arise a lot less powerful feelings than displaying the final result – a delicious meal, or a Star Wars Lego spaceship.
  2. Make the first order free: Blue Apron offers $30 off the first delivery. This eliminates of one of the biggest objections: “I don’t know if I like the product and I’m unsure whether to spend money on it.” By offering the first product/order for free, you’ll cross the barrier and start a conversation with your audience.
  3. Get them to say Yes: Once a person says “Yes” to you once, they’re more likely to continue doing so. The first “Yes” will start a sequence that’s harder to break than continue.

Getting people accept your free offer is a powerful first step to converting them to paying customers. As explained by CopyBlogger:

“We are driven to remain consistent in our attitudes, words, and actions. So, when we are led to make a commitment of some kind, to go on record or take a stand or make a decision, there is an urge to remain consistent with that original commitment later on.“

154. 99designs – Money-Back Guarantee

99designs removes a huge possible threat when they mention the money-back guarantee in their ad copy.

If the customer doesn’t like the result, they’re free to turn it down and get their money back.

99designs demonstrates a high level of confidence with this offer, essentially saying that “We’re sure that our product is great and you’ll like the results. Because we’re so sure, we’re okay with taking on the risk.

Test a money-back guarantee like 99designs

Test a money-back guarantee like 99designs

99designs’ Facebook ad is also a great example of including the product’s full price in the ad. $499 for a logo + working website seems like a bargain.

Key Takeaways:

  1. Promise a money-back guarantee: According to ConversionXL, “Guarantees eliminate or reduce the perceived risks your prospects might have.” 99designs’ money-back guarantee assures people that they’re in good company. Be careful not to shoot yourself in the foot with this offer, however – if you can’t afford it, don’t do it.
  2. No link description: If you want to emphasize your ad headline, leave the link description unfilled. There’s another good reason for that – people may not be willing to commit to reading your ad, so it makes sense to shout out the core message loudly and clearly.
  3. Reveal the price: As you already know, people love to see the numbers. Adding pricing information to your Facebook ad makes your offer more straightforward and tells people exactly what to expect. When someone clicks on 99designs’ ad, they’re probably happy to pay $499 for the deal.

Startup entrepreneur Ash Maurya’s article on VentureHacks included a few pricing experiments with a photo-sharing service. He tested a single, straightforward $49/yr offer vs. two plans ($49/yr and $24/yr) vs. three plans (added a freemium plan).

The result? The single price offer won.

People prefer hassle-free and simple pricing to complex formulas.

155. Dollar Shave Club – Join Our Club

“Our genius members figured out the smarter way to shave. They get Dollar Shave Club razors delivered for just a few dollars.”

This Dollar Shave Club ad tells a story about an exclusive set of members who enjoy the benefits of using the service — and this story makes you want to belong.

According to an article in Psychology Today, the need to belong comes from a fundamental human need to form and maintain a minimum amount of lasting, positive, and significant interpersonal relationships.

We all want to belong, and Dollar Shave Club knows it.

This Dollar Shave Club’s Facebook ad makes people want to belong

This Dollar Shave Club’s Facebook ad makes people want to belong

Key Takeaways:

  1. Make them want to belong: Create a sense of a community around your product and make all the members feel like they’re part of something bigger. This has worked for Apple with iPhone users, and it works in this Facebook ad by Dollar Shave Club. People want to be part of an exclusive community.
  2. Turn your service into a story: Did you notice that the Dollar Shave Club’s ad copy sounded just like a customer testimonial? What it really did was to masterfully describe how their subscription service works through the eyes of a customer.
  3. Word Choice: When writing your Facebook ad copy, use strong words with the personality that you want to be associated with your brand. This example uses words like “genius” and “delightful”, creating positive feelings around the product.

156. Google – It’s All About YOU

Google’s Facebook ad emphasizes that their offer is about you – not them, not your potential clients, but you.

The ad looks at every benefit through the prism of “you”:

  • New domains that tell your story
  • Get your domain today
  • Find a domain name for your story

Google’s ad leaves no doubt that it’s here to serve you as best as it can.

Google’s Facebook ad is all about you

Google’s Facebook ad is all about you

Key Takeaways:

  1. Use the word you: Performance coach Tony Robbins calls feeling significant one of the six basic human needs. Make your customer feel important by letting them know you actually care about them — and talk directly to them, not everyone at once.
  2. Offer a riddle. Google’s ad starts with words: “The perfect ending to every beginning.” This makes the readers hit a mental pause button to stop and think about what that means. People hate unsolved riddles, so they’re compelled to spend more time figuring out your message.
  3. Make the choice simple: Google talks about their product without mentioning any benefits or features. They simply state that the customer can get a domain to tell their story. By leaving out all the specifics, Google’s ad sidesteps any technical-based client objections. Without mentioning any features, they’re basically saying, “It’s good and you don’t need to worry about the specifics.

157. Intercom – Let’s Be Friends

Intercom’s Facebook ad takes a similar approach to Google’s. They address their customer like they’re talking with an old friend, making suggestions to improve their results. The words “you” and “your” appear four times in the first two sentences alone.

Intercom’s Facebook ad addresses you as a friend

Intercom’s Facebook ad addresses you as a friend

Key Takeaways:

  1. The land of “should”: This ad aligns with the reader’s interests immediately by saying that “You shouldn’t need to” do extra work to send out emails. This appeals to the reader’s pride — “You’re right, my time is more valuable than that!” — and creates a strong foundation to build on.
  2. Check your ad copy on all platforms: The text beneath the image — “Marketing automation is broken. We fixed it. Introducing Sma…” — cuts off before the name of the featured offer appears. In situations like this, we’d recommend adjusting the ad copy to fit Facebook’s parameters so the entire message is visible.

158. Adobe — Let The Image Speak For Itself

We’ve already mentioned that you should use real photos of your products or team, not stock photos, to make your Facebook ads more authentic. But what if your product is stock photos?

Adobe manages to take the most common complaint about stock photography — they’re boring — and turn it into a strength with a gorgeous landscape photo. Combined with a pink logo and overlay that almost leaps off the screen, Adobe implies that with their library, you can avoid the lifeless hell of standard stock photo image choices.

Adobe's ad takes stock photos in a different direction

Adobe’s ad takes stock photos in a different direction – image source

Key Takeaways:

  1. Don’t ignore the details: Adobe includes the ID number of the stock photo in the ad to emphasize that this is just one of myriad images you’ll be able to choose from if you join their service.
  2. Short and sweet: Unlike the text in the Intercom ad above that runs beyond the limits of the space, the copy in Adobe’s ad totals just 13 words. And while we applaud their brevity, there’s one missed opportunity that we can’t overlook — the “Learn More” call to action. Something like “Try For Free” or “See More Images” might have lead to more engagement.

159. GetResponse – Do it NOW

When appearing in the messy Facebook news feed, GetResponse’s sky-blue ad draws all sorts of attention to itself.

It’s so colorful that it’s almost impossible to ignore.

GetResponse’s Facebook ad uses words like “Now” and “Today”

GetResponse’s Facebook ad uses words like “Now” and “Today”

Another reason we like this ad is the headline: “Start Your Free Trial Now!”

As we’ll expand on below, clear commands that leave no room for doubt are always better than a generic “Learn More” or “Submit” button.

Key Takeaways:

  1. Ask them to do it NOW: Now, today, right away… all these words contribute to a sense of urgency and nudge people to take action without thinking it over too much. Applying urgency on a landing page helped one entrepreneur increase sales by 332%.
  2. Simple design: The clearer and simpler your ad design, the more eyes it will potentially draw. Facebook news feeds are full of amateur photography and stock photos. A simple and colorful animation that you personalize with basic Photoshop skills can work wonders.
  3. CTA and motivation match: Why would anybody click on your call-to-action? What will they get by doing so? Your call-to-actions should match with the prospect’s motivation and expectations. GetResponse’s ad doesn’t say “Learn More” because people may not be interested in simply learning more. They might want to test the product and see it work for themselves.

Creating CTA Button Copy

Michael Aagaard has been doing button tests for more than four years. After seeing test after test, he developed two simple questions to help marketers write the all-important CTA button copy:

  • What is my prospect’s motivation for clicking this button?
  • What is my prospect going to get when (s)he clicks this button?

Answering those two questions will give you a much more specific and effective direction for your CTA — and hopefully lead to more conversions.

160. Groupon – Time Is Running Out

When confronted with scarcity and urgency, people start to make irrational decisions.

People just can’t seem to resist a good offer when the time’s running out.

Groupon’s 4-hour flash sale leaves literally no time for second guessing, making people claim the bargain right away.

Groupon sets a clear end time to a limited-time offer

Groupon sets a clear end time to a limited-time offer

Key Takeaways:

  1. Use urgency to your advantage: Promote limited-time offers, flash sales, limited-stock items, etc. If you’ve ever missed a flight by 5 minutes, you’ll know the horrible feeling of losing. When confronted with a limited-time offer, people won’t think of the possible objections they’d consider otherwise.
  2. Set an exact time frame: If your Facebook ad says, “Sale ends in 24 hours”, you’re giving visitors an open-ended timespan that doesn’t inspire immediate action. But if your ad says “The sale ends at 5 PM EDT”, people will know both how much time they have, and that time is running out.
  3. Add a promo code: The main difference between a discount-for-all and discount-for-promo-code-owners is the sense of exclusivity. It says to readers that not everyone applies to the discount, only the exclusive club who knows the secret code, making the deal even more lucrative.

161. Infolinks – Convince with Testimonials

Infolinks’ Facebook ad image displays a quote by one of their customers: “I made an extra $500 this month from my site with Infolinks.”

What makes this ad extremely powerful is the real photo of the client.

Marketing Experiments shows that using a real person associated with your product instead of a stock photo increases conversion by 35%.

As I explained in my social proof post:

“When you use a stock photo of ‘gorgeous people laughing in pantsuits,’ we wonder why you don’t want to show us the real people who work for you — and that doesn’t make you look good.”

Infolinks uses real testimonials from real people in ads

Infolinks uses real testimonials from real people in ads

Key Takeaways:

  1. Convince with testimonials: People like to hear others’ opinions — especially when those opinions affirm their own. If you can show that regular customers are happy with your product and enjoying the benefits, it’s a sign that you’re worthy of trust.
  2. Real images instead of stock photos: As I’ve explained before: “Your About Us page’s job is to show me who you truly are. But that multi-cultural stock photo you have of gorgeous people laughing in pant suits makes everything look fake.”
  3. Only use effective social proof: Using weak testimonials with no compelling stats or benefits can do you an anti-favor. As KlientBoost blogger Jacob McMillen explains: “If you have negative social proof, the best thing you can do is eliminate the metrics being displayed.” Unimpressive testimonials can work against you, leaving a negative impression of your brand.

A Bit More On Testimonials

In fact, there’s no need to limit yourself to customer testimonials. You can also get a boost from these sources:

  1. Testimonials from your employees: Many employees do this without asking -— especially if your company is a great place to work —- but it doesn’t hurt to ask them to share their positive experiences with the world.
  2. Industry experts: If a busy influencer takes the time to give you a review, they must think you’re worth talking to. There’s also the halo effect – when an influencer praises your brand, people will associate you with the famous person’s glory and fame.
  3. Third-party reviews: Visit niche review sites in your industry such as Yelp, TrustRadius or G2Crowd — and llok at the existing reviews for your product or service. These could serve as social proof for your next Facebook ads campaign.

162. Buffer – Marketing + GIFs = ????

Yes, you can now use GIFs in Facebook ads.

On February 2, 2017, AdWeek announced that Facebook quietly added the ability for brands to include animated GIFs in their video ads.

Start using GIFs in your Facebook ads like Buffer

Start using GIFs in your Facebook ads like Buffer

Now, there’s more reason than ever to get this ultimate GIFs guide by Buffer.

Key Takeaways:

  1. Use GIFs instead of videos: This feature is fresh out of the oven, and you’ll have the chance to be among the first to test it out.
  2. The mystery of blue images: You might have noticed that the majority of the Facebook ad examples in this article have a blue-ish image. Why is that? We’re not 100% sure, but it might have to do with the fact that blue is the color linked to creativity and confidence, two traits you’d like people to associate with your brand.
  3. Promise the complete answer: When sharing content on Facebook, make it sound like the best resource on the given topic. For example, Buffer’s ad is for an ultimate guide that promises to provide everything there is to know on the topic.

Here’s another gif shared in Buffer’s Facebook news feed:

Buffer’s GIFs help to draw more attention

Buffer’s GIFs help to draw more attention

163. VW – Take Advantage Of Advanced Functionality

Facebook’s selection of ads has made slow but steady advances over the years. Like the addition of gifs mentioned above, these changes incorporate modern functionality that can support more advanced ads and improve user experience.

Facebook Canvas ads, introduced in 2016, are a good example of this underused versatility. As an expandable format, Canvas ads go beyond static text-and-image ads with videos, images, carousels, and slides.

Volkswagen put the Canvas format to good use in this ad:

Key Takeaways:

  1. Focus on user experience: This Canvas construction offers touchable zoom and tilt-to-pan functionality that makes the ad more fun to engage with.
  2. Maintain perspective regardless of budget: Even though it’s clear that a lot of time, money, and energy went into this VW ad, the enhanced functions are all put in place to highlight the product on offer. If your team or agency doesn’t have the bandwidth to create something this elaborate, you can still produce something customer-centric that provides solutions for your users’ pain points.

Create Your Own Best Facebook Ad Examples

Feeling inspired? Check out our top Facebook ad tips to get started, and maybe you’ll see your own ad in this list one day.

And if you want to see some results like the ones from our ads, learn more about how we can help you improve your overall ROI.

Over 389 businesses got a proposal from us in June, 2020

free proposal graphicfree proposal graphicGET MY FREE PROPOSAL
Continue

What's In The Proposal?

Competitor Info
Competitor Info
Optimization Tips
Optimization Tips
Custom Pricing
Custom Pricing
... and so much more!
Last Step
Previous step
"

When it comes to PPC, the first person I turn to is Johnathan Dane. He and his team cut through the bullshit and get straight to the point with the goal of making you more money. Work with him.

"
Peep Laja
Peep Laja
Founder @ ConversionXL
Please enter a valid URL (e.g. www.myhomepage.com)
Send my free proposal
Previous step
phone icon

Prefer to call?


Reach us directly to chat with one of our PPC & CRO experts


Call Now

(866) 204-2028

Processing...

Thanks!

Please look out for an email from us.

Close window

Whoops!
problem here.

try again